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Re: CMYK Only - Profitable Printing

Posted: Tue Aug 09, 2016 3:15 pm
by ABDada
My next website will be 100% white shirts with some viral potential.  We're working on the code now and the premise is you can get free shirts if you can get enough of your friends to "cheer you on" when you're about to add an item to the cart.  All you have to do is share a link to the shirt (personalize link) and your friends will see your shirt and you'll have a "chat box" for them to cheer you on.  The idea is to get people partying when they buy, and maybe get their friends to jump in and try to earn a free/discounted shirt, too.

My average cost of goods sold on a white tee is now under $1.92 including shirt, labor and ink costing.  What's the harm in giving away a $2 costed tee if it brings 30-50 people to the site to cheer their friend on to making the purchase?

Re: CMYK Only - Profitable Printing

Posted: Thu Aug 11, 2016 4:16 am
by wtf11
ABDada what rip are you using for your P600 ?

Re: CMYK Only - Profitable Printing

Posted: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:30 pm
by GullPrint
ABDada wrote:My average cost of goods sold on a white tee is now under $1.92 including shirt, labor and ink costing.
@ ABDada
Where can I buy t-shirts so price can be $1.92 total?
The cheapest decent quality I was able to find ~$2 & and there is no labor and ink costing

Re: CMYK Only - Profitable Printing

Posted: Sun Dec 18, 2016 3:51 pm
by Andy
I think $1.92 might be a little low.

But you should be able to get blank white shirts at $1.40 - $1.50

Cmyk only inks will be cheap like 25 cents.

Re: CMYK Only - Profitable Printing

Posted: Wed Dec 21, 2016 12:06 am
by MetalGuru
I also recommend doing CMYK only if just starting out. It allows you to learn the machine, and any errors from learning and experimenting are cheap to fix.

White ink is not really for a hobby shop or one shirt every couple days. Using CMYK only(dupont), you can get away with only doing a couple head cleanings a day if not printing. 

Marketers sell the white ink on dark shirt because it is a big WOW factor, and gets the sale. However, it is not really a viable option for a noob or beginner with no business coming in.

DTG is very profitable once learned, but it does take effort.

Re: CMYK Only - Profitable Printing

Posted: Wed Dec 21, 2016 8:27 am
by FloridaClay
A large number of shirts are sold with text or single color image only. As such, use only CMYK for full color images but use a 1/1 press for color (white) ink on dark shirts. A little more time to set up for pressing, but factoring in the additional expense of maintenance and spoiled goods with using white ink in a DTG printer, it works out cheaper.   

Re: CMYK Only - Profitable Printing

Posted: Thu Dec 22, 2016 1:11 pm
by Andy
MetalGuru wrote:I also recommend doing CMYK only if just starting out. It allows you to learn the machine, and any errors from learning and experimenting are cheap to fix.

White ink is not really for a hobby shop or one shirt every couple days. Using CMYK only(dupont), you can get away with only doing a couple head cleanings a day if not printing. 

Marketers sell the white ink on dark shirt because it is a big WOW factor, and gets the sale. However, it is not really a viable option for a noob or beginner with no business coming in.

DTG is very profitable once learned, but it does take effort.
I 100% agree with this post. White ink is in no way profitable for very low volumes of printing just a few white ink shirts per day or week.

Re: CMYK Only - Profitable Printing

Posted: Fri Dec 23, 2016 10:35 am
by Zinalias
So how often do you need to do a maintenance when printing White ink? 
i heard that about each 5-10 shirts printed there's need to do a wiper blade and caping station cleaning and maybe a head cleaning too, (i believe the one did by hand arround the head, but dont know if also a nozzle cleaning which consumes ink btw)

Re: CMYK Only - Profitable Printing

Posted: Fri Jun 09, 2017 11:24 am
by robotza
White ink requires you to do daily maintenance . Also the ink needs to be agitated as much as possible to prevent pigment separation